BEDFORD TOWNSHIP.

Bedford township is No. 8 in N. R. 4, and is bounded on the north by Walnut Grove township, on the south by McDonough county, on the east by Warren, and on the west by Terre Haute. The land lying in the southeast and south part of the township is flat prairie, the soil of which is a deep black loam. In the north and northwest part of the township the land is undulating with a brown clay subsoil. On the ridges which skirt the streams the soil is of less depth and of a lighter color than that of the prairies. It is usually a dark brown yellow color, being light on the slopes of the hills and partaking of the sub­ soil. Formerly these ridges were for the most part timbered, but much of the timber has been cut off and the process of denudation still goes on.

Springs are numerous throughout the township and some are large and valuable, furnishing a constant supply of fresh water, in quantities sufficient for the necessities of large herds of cattle.

On Sec. 6 are limestone quarries which have been worked to some extent. Blocks of any desired size, from one to two or three feet, maybe had, some of the larger are of a yellowish brown color, others are tinged with blue or light creamy gray. Sandstone quarries also abound near the same range, two specimens appear, they are of a dark gray and creamy yellow.

Honey creek enters the township at the southwest corner of Sec. 6, flows northwest through Sec. 9, and through the northeast of Sec. 8, and southwest of Sec. 5, and through the south half of Sec. 6. This creek is fed by tributaries running north ; one running through the west part of Secs. 16 and 9 finds a terminus near the west line of that section.

color than that of the prairies. It is usually a dark brown yellow color, being light on the slopes of the hills and partaking of the sub­ soil. Formerly these ridges were for the most part timbered, but much of the timber has been cut off and the process of denudation still goes on.

Springs are numerous throughout the township and some are large and valuable, furnishing a constant supply of fresh water, in quantities sufficient for the necessities of large herds of cattle.

On Sec. 6 are limestone quarries which have been worked to some extent. Blocks of any desired size, from one to two or three feet, may -be had, some of the larger are of a yellowish brown color, others are tinged with blue or light creamy gray. Sandstone quarries also abound near the same range, two specimens appear, they are of a dark gray and creamy yellow.

Honey creek enters the township at the southwest corner of Sec. 6, flows northwest through Sec. 9, and through the northeast of Sec. 8, and southwest of Sec. 5, and through the south half of Sec. 6. This creek is fed by tributaries running north ; one running through the west part of Secs. 16 and 9 finds a terminus near the west line of that section.

Raritan is a flourishing town of 300 inhabitants, containing fifty dwellings, three churches, and ten business houses, a postoffice, print­ing office and several mechanical establishments. It is situated on a high plat of ground on Sec. 11, the principal streets of which run east and west. The town was named in honor of the Raritan river in New Jersey, from which the township owes its first few settlers, a number of whom went from that neighborhood to Fulton county and made set­tlements there, and after moved into this township.

The first store was started in Raritan in the spring of 1856, by Gulick & Voorhees, who continued the business until the following spring of 1857, when they were superseded by Jaques Voorhees, who sold out the next year to Tharp & Eltinge, soon after which Mr. Tharp sold his interest in the business to Eltinge and formed partnership with Groendyke in 1859. This store was situated on the corner on the south side of the main street. Eltinge sold his interest in the business to Elijah Day, who closed up the business in 1867. Parks and Jaques Voorhees then started a dry goods store under the firm name of Parks & Voorhees. This was in 1867. They were succeeded by Dr. H. F. Parks.

The first blacksmith shop in the town was built in August, 1858, by Jaques Voorhees for U. D. Voorhees. He carried on the business until 1865, when J. K. Barns was taken in as a partner. They continued together for two years, and sold out to Douglass Bros., who continued the business until John M. Johnston, the present owner, bought them out. C. Hartman started a wagon shop about 1860. A confectionery was started in 1865, by J. Tharp.

In 1858 the first hotel was started by Charles Hartshorn. He quit the business. In 1863, I. V. D. Kelley built a hotel, and rented the same. In 1861 he sold the same to C. V. D. Spader. John Grovenback went into the business in 1870.

The first physician was Dr. Day. Ile built a residence in the town and after a few years sold out to Dr. Elliott. This was in 1862, and this was Dr. Elliott's first field of practice. He died in 1863.

CHURCH       SETTLERS

 

 

History of Mercer and Henderson Counties.

 

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