Fulton County Ledger
June 11, 1885


Transcribed by Judy Churchill.
 

PERSONAL

Miss Maggie Anderson is visiting in Abingdon.

Mrs. Bissell, sister of C. D. Hoblitt, is visiting her brother and family.

David Beeson returned to Canton on Monday, after an absence of over four months. He has been in St. Louis, New Orleans, Florida and part of the time in Ohio and is in excellent health.

Wm. Bolton has secured a situation in the First National Bank of this city and a few years hence he will doubtless be the trusted cashier of some prosperous bank.

Thomas Bowers, wife and child were in the city this week. They leave today for Philadelphia, where Tom has secured a position in a spice-mill. He has been employed at Lewistown for some months.

Charley Dean, son of W. O. Dean, went to St. Louis Monday to visit relatives.

Rev. Dempster Davidson, of Lewistown, was in Canton yesterday afternoon.

Dr. H. M. Harrison, of Bushnell, was a caller at the Ledger office Saturday last. The Doctor will visit Canton professional every Tuesday, as will be seen by notice in another place.

Mrs. A. W. Heald is visiting her parents in Havana.

True Higbie left Monday for Alton, to attend the commencement exercises of the school in that city, of which he was formerly a pupil.

Miss Nettie Kreider, of Prairie City, visited friends in Canton Saturday and Sunday.

Mrs. M. J. Law went to Newton, Iowa, a few days since, where she will spend the summer.

Dr. Nelson, of Marietta, was in Canton Thursday and Friday of last week.

Will Plattenburg, teller of the First National Bank, has been commissioned a notary public.
James Ross, a pupil of the Northfield, Minnesota school, has returned home for his summer vacation.

Minor Sutton, who has been attending school at Dixon, Ill., is at home for the summer vacation. John Whiting, a pupil of Shurtleff Theological Seminary, Alton, also returned home Friday, last.

George W. Stipp arrived in Canton Sunday morning from Wellington, Kansas and Monday went Lewistown, to visit his parents.

Wm. H. Stout, editor of the DeWitt Times, Nebraska, and Mrs. Joseph Stout, of Omaha, are visiting Mr. Stout’s parents in Canton.

Judge Shope was called to Springfield last week by telegram, to take his seat on the supreme bench, court being in session.

George L. Snively, son of P. H. Snively, of Cuba, returned Wednesday from Lexington, Ky., where he has been attending the University in that city for the last ten months.

H. B. Taylor (former publisher of the old Prairie City Herald), employed a the Register office the past winter, has gone to Iowa and will engage in the stationery business in some town in that state.

James M. Thompson and A. Van Doren and wife started Thursday last for Danville, Ill., the former and the latter to be treated for cancer.

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From Blyton, Ill., June 2, 1885

Four tramps passed through this vicinity the past few days. They were the first that were seen here in a long time.

Mr. Wm. Basel started to Omaha, Nebraska, Monday last.

Mr. A. Cunningham is the happiest man in Shanghai, just because it’s a boy.

Mr. D. W. and Miss Carrie Conklin were visiting friends in Elmwood Friday and Saturday last.\

One day last week one of Mr. J. B. Knott’s horses fell dead in its harness.

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Cuba, Ill., June 9, 1885

Mrs. D. E. Hughes is slowly improving.

Grandma Lasswell is quite poorly with dropsy.

Rev. W. B. Shinn, of Canton, was calling on Cuba friends Monday.

Dr. W. N. Cline is giving good satisfaction as road commissioner.

Ira Kuykendall, of Liverpool, spent Saturday with Cuba friends.

Mrs. Sarah Harmison is still very low—no hopes of her recovery.

Perry Stevenson, of Lewistown, is teaching school in the Spry district.

Charles Brokaw and wife, of Joshua, called on friends here Monday.

J. M. Stewart, of Lewistown and Austin Stewart, of Jacksonville, called on Cuba Friends Saturday.

Cord Snively and wife, of Bushnell, spent Saturday and Sunday with relatives here.

Dr. Hopewell, of Lincoln, Illinois, removed a tapeworm from J. C. Murray Saturday last. The patient is doing well.

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From the Farmington Bugle, 5th

Lee Stetson departed Monday for Kansas, where he will remain indefinitely.

Miss Sarilla Brimmer left Monday for Watertown, N. Y., where she will pass the summer.

Last Monday officer Lincoln, of Peoria, visited London Mills to look up matters concerning the Cadwallader safe robbery. Three boys, named respectively Simpson, Struble and Harlan, were arrested. On examination Struble admitted that he had been one of the party who stole $20 from a package of bills in the post office safe last year; was the one who took a watch from the hotel; and also $5 from the trunk of a boarder. He also admitted that he was concerned in a store robbery of a more recent date; in which Simpson was also implicated. Harlan would admit nothing. The boys were taken to Lewistown to await action of the grand jury. Harlan’s father bailed him, but the others are still in dura catena.

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From Fairview, Ill., June 9, 1885

C. S. Brokaw sold a very fine horse today to D. W. Wittum. We did not learn the price.

S. S. Brokaw reports a worm cutting off considerable of his young corn.

L. K. Couch, of Deerfield, came to town today and ordered his Ledger continued. Cash accompanied this order. If he is afflicted by lameness, he is one of the happy men of that township.

Last Week James Davis had a cow and horse struck by lightning.

Last Thursday H. H. Hartough received a dispatch from his son-in-law, Dr. ________, of Norwood Park, stating that his son Frank was drowned on Wednesday evening. His age was about 15 years. From a letter received since they learned that Frank, in company with two other boys, went to the Calamut River after school, and as a heavy rain had fallen the river was high and not knowing it, waded in too deep. He was not able to swim, and consequently drowned.

Morgan Lawson, who resides near Ellisville, came to town today and we notice him with two new cultivators in his wagon, purchased here. Doc. Swygert also purchased two new cultivators.

Mrs. H. V. Low and son William went to Canton today, to visit some of their relatives.

T. Pumyea is digging a cellar under his store. He keeps a good stock of groceries.

Henry Rusman and wife were called to Smithfield last week, owing to the serious illness of Mrs. R.’s mother.

Andrew Rock and Mr. Eveland, two of Deerfield’s good citizens, were here on Friday. They are both old friends of the Ledger.

J. R. Rothman, of Canton, was here last week.

J. N. Suydam, our postmaster, as well as druggist, has cleaned up his store, which makes it look much neater. He informs us that he intends in the near future to put in a glass front and procure a new stock of glassware and otherwise improve his store.

Our street commissioner, John Voorhees, is doing some excellent work, repairing and laying new sidewalk.

Amos Wilson is building an addition to his house. His parents expect to reside with him.

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From Joshua, June 9, 1885

Mrs. Sam Shrader visited relatives at Fairview the latter part of last week.

Mrs. J. L. Miller spent last week in Canton visiting relatives.

Wm. McQuaid, of Creston, Iowa, made us a very pleasant call one day last week.

Augustus Emory was confined to his bed Saturday with cold and rheumatism.

Mrs. Jesse Cunningham is sick.

Mrs. J. A. Furrey and Miss Anna Eichman spent last Monday in Peoria, it being Miss Anne’s birthday anniversary.

Mrs. Charles Martin has been laid up from a stroke of paralysis the last two weeks.

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From the Vermont Chronicle, 5th

Mr. Lycurgus Stockton took his wife to Terre Haute, Indiana, Wednesday, to consult Dr. Flower, of Boston. Mrs. Stockton is in very poor health.

William J. Moore has been notified that his application for a pension has at last been granted, and that he will receive $4 per month, to date from 1863—the back pay amounting to something more than $1,000.


 



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